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Jul 9, 2012

Screening at the American Cinematheque - July 9 - 15, 2012



The Cinematheque has a great week in store in case you can't make it down to San Diego for Comic-Con (where I will be).  Some big classics with GONE WITH THE WIND and A STAR IS BORN and you'll want to Wash That Man Right Out of Your Hair with SOUTH PACIFIC.

Billy Bob Thornton will be on hand to sign books and introduce a pair of movies he was in.  As well, there are a couple of great seminars for filmmakers.

THE EGYPTIAN - 6712 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, CA  90028





Thursday, July 12th - 7:30pm - Spielberg Theater

Another great edition of the ongoing lecture series for filmmakers.

From the Cinematheque website:

DIRECTOR'S INTENT: INTERPRETING THE SCENE





Has a certain “economy of expression” come to dominate your truer ambitions to visually interpret your cinema? Have 100-year-old systematized production means and techniques come to rule your filmmaking practice? Has the pressure of efficiency and practicality replaced your ability to make something personal and cinematic?
The creation of rewarding narrative cinema has always depended upon the director's ability to translate and interpret written work into a unique and personal visual expression. While certain production concerns (dialogue, camera placement, performance) consume many filmmakers' greater intensions, the most renowned film directors soar by creatively digging into their vast arsenal of "cinematic tools" to overcome limitations and to visually and aurally enhance their films.
Learning how to transcend the contemporary “norms” of cinematic scene construction is key to successfully emerging in an increasingly crowded film arena.
Narrative cinema has always been more than performance, dialogue and standardized uses of cinematography!
While the basic "master shot/shot/reverse shot" breakdown may be the most efficient way of shooting a scene, it is not the only way!
• How can enhanced mise-en-scene infuse greater meaning into a scene than the standard master shot?
• How does the long take dynamically reestablish character depth and add new meaning into a scene?
• What lies beyond a “realistic” and “Method” approach to acting? What is the effect of other forms of acting style choices?
• What is the actual effect of shooting a scene without reverse angles or as a creatively designed two-shot?
• How can basing your shot compositions on a character’s demeanor actually create a more dynamic and intense relationship between the character and the audience than pages of (expository) dialogue?
• What really needs to be present in a close up in order to make it truly matter cinematically?
• Why is the protagonist always placed in the center of the frame?
• Why isn’t sound and color design orchestrated in a more profound, meaningful way in cinema today?
• When is the use of slow motion, dramatic camera angles and opticals an enhancement to narrative consistency and character establishment?
• How does losing a reverse angle or an establishment shot in a sequence focus and intensify the relationship between the audience and a primary character?
It’s not money that sets you apart from being an Almodovar, Altman, Campion, Coppola, Leigh, Scorsese or a Von Trier… it’s clearly understanding how intricately linked original and personal visual expression are to achieving your ultimate filmmaking career objectives.
It’s time to wake up your deepest directorial ambitions and abilities.
Former Director of Programming (Los Angeles Film Festival, Palm Springs International Short Film Festival) and Film/Visual Consultant Thomas Ethan Harris offers a Director's Workshop that asks you to move beyond traditional visualizing practices to explore the true glories of reinterpreting the cinematic scene to include personal and artistic sheen.
So before you finish writing that script, before you shoot that film, take this one of a kind, extremely motivating Director’s Workshop designed to get you back in touch with your creative instincts so that you can make the film you intended to make in the first place and ultimately score the career you want…and deserve!
Film clips will be used to inspire an open dialogue with the audience.


Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Thursday, July 12th - 7:30pm

THIS MUST BE THE PLACE: MUSIC ON THE BIG SCREEN AT THE AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE

GIMME SHELTER (1970, Janus Films; Directed by: Albert Maysles and David Maysles)




The series of concert movies continues at the Cinematheque with this legendary Rolling Stones movie that ends on a shocking note.

THE TRAILER:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Friday, July 13th - 7:30pm

Billy Bob Thornton will be on hand to sign copies of his book THE BILLY BOB TAPES: A CAVE FULL OF GHOSTS and introduce this double feature of movies starring...well...him.

THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE (2001, Focus Features; Directed by Joel and Ethan Coen)





The Coen Brothers take a stab at a modern Film Noir in this tale of a Barber that gets caught up in a blackmailing scheme that doesn't go exactly as planned.  Do they ever?

Followed by...

A SIMPLE PLAN (1998, Paramount; Directed by: Sam Raimi)




This Billy Bob double feature is also a Billy Bob Crime-Drama double feature, and here he and Bill Paxton come across a bag full of cash and then all hell breaks loose.

Sam Raimi (SPIDER-MAN) brings his unique style of directing to a movie that could easily be a run-of-the-mill movie, but it turns out as quite the opposite.

THE TRAILER for THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE:




THE TRAILER for A SIMPLE PLAN:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Saturday, July 14th - 10:30am

EGYPTIAN THEATER HISTORIC TOUR & FOREVER HOLLYWOOD





One of the tours to take in Los Angeles - the regular walking tour of one of the historic Egyptian theater in Hollywood.  Production costs and tax incentives may have driven most of the production out of Los Angeles and California, but when it comes down to it, Los Angeles is still and always will be the heart and soul of movies and the movie industry.  The American Cinematheque has kept that alive by moving their operations into the Egyptian, and taking you behind the scenes of the history of the building and the legendary area surrounding it - Hollywood and Hollywood Boulevard!

The tour concludes with a screening of FOREVER HOLLYWOOD, a 55 minute 1999 documentary produced by the Cinematheque and directed by Todd McCarthy and Arnold Glassman (both are also responsible for the amazing documentary VISIONS OF LIGHT: THE ART OF CINEMATOGRAPHY).

Viva Hollywood!


Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Saturday, July 14th - 7:30pm - Spielberg Theater

An evening of more great and hard-to-see silent shorts.  From the Cinematheque website:

SILENT SERIALS





Few examples of silent serials have survived, but, using wildly entertaining clips and complete individual chapters, RetroFormat presents an enormously fun look at a virtually lost era. With complete episodes from GRANT THE REPORTER (1912), WHAT HAPPENED TO MARY (1914), THE PERILS OF PAULINE (1914), THE HAZARDS OF HELEN (1915), A WOMAN IN GREY (1919), CAPTAIN KIDD(1919) and much more, starring Pearl White, Eddie Polo, Charles Hutchison, Ruth Roland.


Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Saturday, July 14th - 8:00pm

THE MODERNS (1988, Nelson Entertainment; Directed by: Alan Rudolph)




In honor of staff member Margot Gerber's 20th anniversary with the Cinematheque (she's cool, trust me), here is a screening of THE MODERNS.  It's MIDNIGHT IN PARIS before MIDNIGHT IN PARIS - well ok without the time travel as American artists experience Paris in the 1920s.

I haven't seen this movie in a while - probably since it first came out, so this is an ideal way to revisit it.

NO TRAILER AVAILABLE.

Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Sunday, July 15th - 7:30pm

SOUTH PACIFIC (1958, 20th Century Fox; Directed by: Joshua Logan)




The Rodgers and Hammerstein Musical gets the really big screen treatment with this rare screening of a 70mm print.

This is part of a series of movies that ran at the Egyptian theater over its 90 year history.

THE TRAILER:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.



THE AERO - 1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica, CA   90403




Thursday, July 12th - 7:30pm

IN SPECTACULAR DIGITAL CINEMA: CLASSICS AND RESTORATIONS ON THE BIG SCREEN


A STAR IS BORN (1954, Warner Bros.; Directed by: George Cukor)




This is the second of many remakes of this movie, but is definitely the most memorable (the first was in 1937, then again in 1976 with Kris Kristofferson and Barbra Streisand and about to be remade again by Clint Eastwood with Beyonce).

Movie star James Mason turns Judy Garland into a star who then surpasses him.  He becomes an outcast and a drunk while she wins awards and becomes Hollywood royalty - all the while trying to keep Mason from imploding.

THE TRAILER:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Friday, July 13th - 7:30pm

IN SPECTACULAR DIGITAL CINEMA: CLASSICS AND RESTORATIONS ON THE BIG SCREEN


TAXI DRIVER (1976, Columbia; Directed by: Martin Scorsese)




Are you talking to me?

Travis Bickle is one unhinged dude.  He drives around New York in his Taxi Cab and takes it upon himself to clean up the streets.

Martin Scorsese's classic movie is one that Leonard Maltin gives only 2 stars.  He thinks it's too dark and nasty, and he's right.  Jodie Foster plays a young prostitute, and there is also the memorable moment wher Bickle takes Cybill Shepherd on a date to a porn theater.

Followed by...

THE COLLECTOR (1965, Columbia; Directed by: William Wyler)




Terrence Stamp collects butterflies, and extends that to collect a female human as well.  Definitely a night of movie characters who need some help with social graces.

THE TRAILER for TAXI DRIVER:




THE TRAILER for THE COLLECTOR:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Saturday, July 14th - 2:00pm

STRIKING A DEAL IN A BAD ECONOMY: FILM FINANCE AND DISTRIBUTION





Guest speakers offer valuable insights on available financing options, how to close investors and securing the right distribution model, plus an in-depth look at foreign distributors, markets and territories, film promotion and advertising. You'll learn the techniques of successful entertainment professionals who have secured the right kind of deals despite the negative economy.


Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Saturday, July 14th - 7:30pm

IN SPECTACULAR DIGITAL CINEMA: CLASSICS AND RESTORATIONS ON THE BIG SCREEN

GONE WITH THE WIND (1939, MGM; Directed by: Victor Fleming)




This movie is true Hollywood.  It's big, it's sweeping, it's dramatic, has huge stars, was a monumental production with a making-of story that is just as interesting as the movie itself.

Frankly you will give a damn as Vivian Leigh as Scarlet O'Hara tries to keep it all together in the south during the Civil War, and try not to fall for the devilish charms of Clark Gable's Rhett Butler.

Guarantee you right now this movie WILL sell out.

THE TRAILER:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Sunday, July 15th - 4:00pm

IN SPECTACULAR DIGITAL CINEMA: CLASSICS AND RESTORATIONS ON THE BIG SCREEN


JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS (1963, Columbia; Directed by: Don Chaffey)



When I first saw JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS I was very young, and was instantly swept away by the visuals, especially the excitement of Jason fighting off skeletons - thanks to the expert effects work of Ray Harryhausen.

I saw this projected a few years ago at the New Beverly, and it is a spectacle.  Take the kids, they'll love it - then tell them later the skeletons weren't from a computer.  I bet they won't believe you.

THE TRAILER:




Link to Information and Tickets HERE.

Sunday, July 15th - 7:30pm

IN SPECTACULAR DIGITAL CINEMA: CLASSICS AND RESTORATIONS ON THE BIG SCREEN


THE LEOPARD (1963, 20th Century Fox; Directed by: Luchino Visconti)





If ever there is a movie that must be seen on the big screen, this is it.  The Cinematheque website refers to this as "Italy's answer to GONE WITH THE WIND" and I heartily agree.

A prince played by Burt Lancaster fights to preserve his family and class during social upheavals.

THE TRAILER:





Link to Information and Tickets HERE.